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How to Enable or Disable the OS X Security Feature that Filters App Downloads



If you have set your Mac to allow apps only from the App Store and you try to install an app from elsewhere, your Mac will say that the app can't be opened because it was not downloaded from the App Store.*




a security feature of os x that limits sources from which you can download apps



Apple designs health-related products to allow privacy for you and to ensure that even when you choose to share information, you can do so with privacy and security in mind. You have control over which information is placed in the Health app and which apps can access your data through it.


With ResearchKit, you choose which studies you want to join, and you control the information you provide to individual research apps. Apps using ResearchKit or CareKit can pull data from the Health app only with your consent. Any apps built using ResearchKit for health-related human subject research must obtain consent from the participants and must provide information about confidentiality rights and the sharing and handling of data.


These apps must also be approved by an independent ethics review board before the study can begin. For certain ResearchKit studies, Apple may be listed as a researcher, receiving data from participants who consent to share their data with researchers, so we can participate with the larger research community in exploring how our technology could improve the way people manage their health. This data is received in a way that does not directly identify the participants to Apple.


Improve Health & Activity and Improve Wheelchair Mode send data from iPhone and Apple Watch to Apple so we can increase the effectiveness of our health and fitness features. This includes data that is shown in the Health, Activity, and Fitness apps, movement measurements, which other fitness apps you have installed, your approximate location, and how long you have been using Apple Watch. The data is not used for any other purpose and does not include personally identifiable information.


Starting in iOS 13 and iPadOS 13, API changes limit the kinds of apps that can see the names of Wi-Fi networks you connect to, which makes it harder for apps to determine your location without your consent. To protect you against apps using Bluetooth to determine your location without your consent, iOS and iPadOS include controls so that an app must ask before accessing Bluetooth for any other purpose than playing audio. And Bluetooth settings allow you to change whether an app has access at any time.


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To offer personalized recommendations and improve your Apple TV experience, Apple collects information about your purchases, downloads, and activity in the Apple TV app, including what you watch on the Apple TV app, connected apps, and your location. You can choose to share what you watch in connected apps to bring all your content together, and you have control over the viewing history used by Apple to provide you with personalized recommendations. You can delete the viewing history Apple holds from connected apps entirely, or choose to delete it app by app.


The feature Enhanced Password Security, introduced in Cisco IOS Software Release 12.2(8)T, allows an administrator to configure MD5 hashing of passwords for the username command. Prior to this feature, there were two types of passwords: Type 0, which is a cleartext password, and Type 7, which uses the algorithm from the Vigen re cipher. The Enhanced Password Security feature cannot be used with protocols that require the cleartext password to be retrievable, such as CHAP.


The removal of passwords of this type can be facilitated through AAA authentication and the use of the Enhanced Password Security feature, which allows secret passwords to be used with users that are locally defined via the username global configuration command. If you cannot fully prevent the use of Type 7 passwords, consider these passwords obfuscated, not encrypted.


This section highlights several methods that can be used in order to secure the deployment of SNMP within IOS devices. It is critical that SNMP be properly secured in order to protect the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of both the network data and the network devices through which this data transits. SNMP provides you with a wealth of information on the health of network devices. This information should be protected from malicious users that want to leverage this data in order to perform attacks against the network.


The Management Plane Protection (MPP) feature in Cisco IOS software can be used in order to help secure SNMP because it restricts the interfaces through which SNMP traffic can terminate on the device. The MPP feature allows an administrator to designate one or more interfaces as management interfaces. Management traffic is permitted to enter a device only through these management interfaces. After MPP is enabled, no interfaces except designated management interfaces accept network management traffic that is destined to the device.


For distributed platforms, Receive ACLs (rACLs) can be an option for Cisco IOS Software Releases 12.0(21)S2 for the 12000 (GSR), 12.0(24)S for the 7500, and 12.0(31)S for the 10720. The rACL protects the device from harmful traffic before the traffic impacts the route processor. Receive ACLs are designed to only protect the device on which it is configured and transit traffic is not affected by an rACL. As a result, the destination IP address any that is used in the example ACL entries below only refers to the physical or virtual IP addresses of the router. Receive ACLs are also considered a network security best practice and should be considered as a long-term addition to good network security.


The CoPP feature can also be used in order to restrict IP packets that are destined to the infrastructure device. In this example, only SSH traffic from trusted hosts is permitted to reach the Cisco IOS device CPU.


Known as both the Generalized TTL-based Security Mechanism (GTSM) and BGP TTL Security Hack (BTSH), a TTL-based security protection leverages the TTL value of IP packets in order to ensure that the BGP packets that are received are from a directly connected peer. This feature often requires coordination from peering routers; however, once enabled, it can completely defeat many TCP-based attacks against BGP.


When you configure this feature with the neighbor maximum-prefix BGP router configuration command, one argument is required: the maximum number of prefixes that are accepted before a peer is shutdown. Optionally, a number from 1 to 100 can also be entered. This number represents the percentage of the maximum prefixes value at which point a log message is sent.


If IP options have not been completely disabled via the IP Options Selective Drop feature, it is important that IP source routing is disabled. IP source routing, which is enabled by default in all Cisco IOS Software Releases, is disabled via the no ip source-route global configuration command. This configuration example illustrates the use of this command:


You can use the ACL Support for Filtering on TTL Value feature, introduced in Cisco IOS Software Release 12.4(2)T, in an extended IP access list to filter packets based on TTL value. This feature can be used in order to protect a device receiving transit traffic where the TTL value is a zero or one. Filtering packets based on TTL values can also be used in order to ensure that the TTL value is not lower than the diameter of the network, thus protecting the control plane of downstream infrastructure devices from TTL expiry attacks.


In Cisco IOS Software Release 12.3(4)T and later, you can use the ACL Support for the Filtering IP Options feature in a named, extended IP access list in order to filter IP packets with IP options present. Filtering IP packets that are based on the presence of IP options can also be used in order to prevent the control plane of infrastructure devices from having to process these packets at the CPU level.


VACLs, or VLAN maps that apply to all packets that enter the VLAN, provide the capability to enforce access control on intra-VLAN traffic. This is not possible with ACLs on routed interfaces. For example, a VLAN map might be used in order to prevent hosts that are contained within the same VLAN from communication with each other, which reduces opportunities for local attackers or worms to exploit a host on the same network segment. In order to deny packets from using a VLAN map, you can create an access control list (ACL) that matches the traffic and, in the VLAN map, set the action to drop. Once a VLAN map is configured, all packets that enter the LAN are sequentially evaluated against the configured VLAN map. VLAN access maps support IPv4 and MAC access lists; however, they do not support logging or IPv6 ACLs.


Private VLANs (PVLANs) are a Layer 2 security feature that limits connectivity between workstations or servers within a VLAN. Without PVLANs, all devices on a Layer 2 VLAN can communicate freely. Networking situations exist where security can be aided by limiting communication between devices on a single VLAN. For example, PVLANs are often used in order to prohibit communication between servers in a publicly accessible subnet. Should a single server become compromised, the lack of connectivity to other servers due to the application of PVLANs might help limit the compromise to the one server.


Gatekeeper in MacOS is now stricter than ever, defaulting to only allow options for apps downloaded from either the App Store or the App Store and identified developers. Advanced Mac users may wish to allow a third option, which is the ability to open and allow apps downloaded from anywhere in macOS Ventura, macOS Monterey, MacOS Big Sur, macOS Catalina, macOS Sierra, macOS High Sierra, and MacOS Mojave.


While the command works, as others have pointed out it still does not stop the OS from warning you before running any document or media that you download. It is still trying to pipe everything through this bs process. I am tempted to roll back an OS version at this point.


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